Finishing Touch Supplying French Provincial Decorative Mouldings Around Melbourne

Decorative mouldings by The finishing Touch

At the Finishing Touch we’ve been busy lately. We have supplied and installed (using our recommended installer) decorative mouldings for a forty five square, post-modern residence in Forest Hills. The crowning glory is the 215mm high Keystone (code # K125) centred above the mitre of the building.  Twelve metres of parapets (code #P7180), sized 180mm x 95mm, seventy five metres of under gutter mouldings (code # PE70) sized 70mm x 70mm, fifty one metres of window architraves (code # W1090) sized 90mm x 40mm and 9.6 metres of window sills (code # WS5RT), sized 133mm x 91mm made up the full complement of decorative mouldings.

A sixty square, French provincial home in East Malvern is currently under development and requires decorative mouldings:
Seventy five metres of French provincial parapet mouldings (model # P8300), sized 300mm x 235mm.
Six metres of French provincial feature parapet (Model #P8430) sized 430mm x 335mm, sits over the top of the above parapet, in the middle as a feature.
Eighty one metres of French provincial parapet on the ground floor (model #P8250), sized 250mm x 195mm.
Two hundred and forty seven metres of French provincial architraves (model # W1100), sized 100mm x 45mm for twelve windows at the front, rear and sides.
Thirty eight metres of French provincial window sills (model # WSR15), sized 135mm x 185mm for the above windows.
Six French provincial arches for the front windows and five for the rear windows (model # W1100).

A builder renovating and restoring a property in Wellington Street, Collingwood, amongst an area of factories and large commercial buildings and showrooms, required six metres of flatband decorative mouldings with a thirty millimetre reveal. This was a special build, custom built to suit and supply only.

Another builder required supply only decorative mouldings for a 60 square French provincial home in East Brighton. The façade should be eye catching with five arches for the five front windows (code # W1090) topped with keystones above the arches (code # GK3) sized 190mm x 140mm x 65mm. Other decorative mouldings supplied were:
One hundred and forty two metres of under gutter mouldings (code # PE70), sized 70mm x 70mm.
Sixty metres of parapet mouldings (code # P7180), sized 180mm x 95mm.
Eighty two metres of window architraves (code # W1090) sized 90mm x 40mm.

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The Modern Arch Has Classical Design Elements Yet Is Lightweight and Decorative

crypt-archway-path

Arches have long been used in building design and in modern times they add a classical, elegant finish to a house build.  Originally built in materials such as stone, marble then cement, the easiest and most effective method to build an arch these days is to use a lightweight house moulding with a steel support.

Dating back to 3000BC was the original arch, the corbel arch consisting of two opposing sets of overlapping corbels, resembling inverted staircases, which meet at a peak and create a structure strong enough to support weight from above. Babylonian architecture made wide use of corbel arches. Then the Romans created a semicircular arch that could support great amounts of weight.  A wooden arch shaped frame was first constructed with stone work being built up around the frame and finally a keystone was set in position. This allowed the wooden frame to be removed and the arch was left in position. Stone arch technology was used on large buildings such as the Colosseum in Rome.

The next major design innovation in arches was in Gothic architecture with the experimental use of pointed arches. The pointed shape introduced a new aesthetic dimension and reduced the arch thrusts by as much as fifty percent which meant that the weight of the roof was now being supported by the arches rather than the walls and therefore the walls could be thinner.

The basket arch is a three-centred arch and sometimes called  ‘basket-handle arch’ or ‘anse de panier’. The Basket arch is a flattened arch whose ellipse like shape is determined by three arcs that are interconnected; with each radius being drawn from a different centre. Also known as Semi elliptical or Elliptical, this style of arch is mainly used in modern day building due to its simple design.

The Finishing Touch are the masters of lightweight decorative mouldings and can create the style and shape of arch desired in any building design.  For a custom made decorative arch moulding made from lightweight materials contact the Finishing Touch.

Architectural Mouldings Provide the Ultimate Decorative Finish

house3

Once a house has been built the work is by no means over.  There’s still the fencing, outdoor areas and landscaping to be constructed and planted to create an attractive, complete living environment. The builders of a post-modern, fifty square home in Donvale at 7 Decontra Close recently finished the fencing with the addition of Victorian style wall caps for the fence line and fifteen Victorian style Pier caps, supplied by the Finishing Touch, creating a stunning  presence on the streetscape.
And what’s a home without windows? Not only are they essential for light, warmth and a view, but they can become a stylish feature with the addition of architectural mouldings. One hundred and thirty metres of window architraves ( model #DGA115A), each measuring 115mmx 40mm, together with fifty five metres of window sills (model # M13), each measuring 145mmx 175mm, were recently supplied to a build on the Ararat Lexton Road,  Lexton.
A post-modern, sixty five square home in Balwyn is under development.  The build requires one hundred and twenty metres of parapet mouldings (model # P8250), sized 250mm x 195mm, 10 window architraves (model # WDG8XY), sized 120mm x 50mm, 120 metres smaller parapet moulding ( model #P8200), sized 200mm x 155mm and arches for the windows. This home promises to emanate style.
The Finishing Touch have built a sound reputation for quality and long lasting architectural decorative mouldings.  They can supply only or builders can contract the Finishing Touch preferred installers Precise Profiles to do the installation. Where the preferred installer completes the installation of decorative mouldings supplied by the Finishing Touch, builders and owners are given a seven year warranty on all works.

Award Winning Architect Uses Decorative Mouldings For A Fine Finish

A Phillip Mannerheim design

A Phillip Mannerheim design

A gorgeous, fifty plus square, two storey home recently built in Nicholson Avenue, Mt. Waverley in the French provincial style owes much of its exterior style to the use of lightweight moulds supplied by The Finishing Touch.  Parapet eave moulds on the upper storey and parapet mouldings for the lower storey with complementary stringer mouldings create a fine finish to the building. Six windows are decorated with architraves whilst arches and keystones adorn the five upstairs windows, creating a stunning façade.

A property currently under development has been designed by renowned, award winning Architect Phillip Mannerheim in the French provincial style. The stunning design for the two storey, sixty square home calls upon the use of decorative architectural mouldings to add a distinguished exterior finish to the house. A grand statement is to be made with a large keystone over the balcony whilst windows are to have a highly decorative finish with French provincial window architraves, feature window blocks either side of the windows and window sill mouldings. Also to be featured are eave parapet mouldings, parapet mouldings between the first and second floor with stringer mouldings 400ml beneath the parapet mouldings.

A more modest, yet highly attractive post-modern home of forty squares is also under development in East Doncaster.  The decorative mouldings to be used for this design include under gutter mouldings, parapet mouldings and quoining panels as well as window architraves on all twenty two windows on the house.

Lightweight decorative mouldings have become popular with Architects, Designers and Builders alike, as they save on costs and time, adding a decorative façade and helping create the intended style of the home, whether French provincial, post-modern, Georgian or Mediterranean.

Arches, Decorative Mouldings, Structure and Beauty

Arches are functional and add beauty to a building. They have been used since prehistoric times, but were originally only able to support small structures such as storerooms. That is, until the Romans created an arch that could support great amounts of weight.  The Roman arch was used to construct buildings as large as palaces.  Other cultures copied this style and structure and new variations were created, such as the Horseshoe or Moorish arch, used in Islamic architecture.

Moorish arch   Horseshoe or Moorish Arch

Corbel Arch

The Corbel arch is one of the oldest types of arch building, dating back to 3000BC. A corbel arch consists of two opposing sets of overlapping corbels, resembling inverted staircases, which meet at a peak and create a structure strong enough to support weight from above. Babylonian architecture made wide use of corbel arches.

Corbel Arch  Corbel Arch

Roman Arch

This is a semicircular arch. The original Roman arches were made of stone.  A wooden frame was first constructed in the shape of an arch with stone work being built up around the frame and finally a keystone was set in position. The wood frame could then be removed and the arch was left in position. Stone arch technology was used on Roman monuments such as the Colosseum in Rome.  The Roman arch can still be seen today in modern architecture, now constructed from more modern materials.

Roman arch  Roman Arches

Gothic Arch

An important innovation of Gothic architecture was the experimental use of pointed arches. The main difference between Roman and Gothic arches was the the pointed shape of the latter, which introduced a new aesthetic dimension and reduced the arch thrusts by as much as fifty percent. With the weight of the roof being supported by the arches rather than the walls, the walls could be thinner.

Reims 10  Gothic Arch

Basket Arch

A three-centered arch—sometimes called a ‘Basket-handle arch’ or ‘Anse de panier’—closely resembles an ellipse, which puts it in a field of its own.The Basket arch is a flattened arch whose ellipse like shape is determined by three arcs that are interconnected; with each radius being drawn from a different centre. Also known as Semi elliptical or Elliptical, this style of arch is mainly used in modern day building due to its simple design.

basket arch  Basket Arch

Mouldings add decorative interest to arches and the Finishing Touch can supply a light weight decorative moulding to suit the style of arch selected for your next building.  Choose from the range or order a custom made moulding.