Finishing Touch Introduces New Adhesive Product

We are so happy with this product that we want all our customers to have it! After five years using the DAP Touch’n’Seal system exclusively we, at The Finishing Touch, have concluded it is the only polyurethane foam product we recommend for our decorative architectural mouldings. It will be available for sale in November through The Finishing Touch and we are currently taking orders.

And why do we recommend DAP Touch’n’Seal? It’s the fastest moulding install method available with a drying and full grab time of only 3-5 mins (depending on humidity levels). Compared to most other polyurethane foam based products, which take 10 mins or more to dry, this is great news for builders where time means money.  And the other alternative, tile adhesive based powders are not really in the race, they are so messy to prepare and take much longer to set.

Touch’n’Seal is versatile too. It can be used for polystyrene foam cladding walls and, because it’s fire rated, it can be used as a gap filler around cables and pipes on building sites. With so many applications it’s a handy system to have on hand, able to be used on wood, masonry, insulating foam boards, metal, plastics and sheetrock.

The system comprises 3 items – Touch ‘n Seal Gun Foam II polyurethane foam, a high-performance, one component, approved Type V Residential Fireblock sealant. Sharpshooter-D Applicator Gun, specially suited for use with Touch ‘n Seal® gun foam products and is the correct one for proper application of the adhesive on architectural mouldings.

And when you’re done Poly Foam Cleaner easily cleans up any foam from hands, tools and applicator guns, dissolving any uncured polyurethane foam. It is important to use this cleaner as it’s  the only cleaner designed for the Sharpshooter –D Applicator Gun, keeping it thoroughly clean so it continues to perform.

 

As there will be limited supply and this is a popular system, we advise you get your orders in now so you can be sure to receive the DAP Touch’n’Seal system when it becomes available for sale in November.  Contact us to place your order.

 

 

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Werribee Park An Example of Ornate Decorative Features

Exterior Werribee Mansion

The Italianate style, which echoes 16th century Italian Renaissance Architecture, was first developed in Britain in 1802 by John Nash and was further developed and popularised by Sir Charles Berry, Architect in the 1830s. Werribee Park Mansion in Werribee, Melbourne was built in this style between 1874 and 1877. It is an outstanding example of the effect of architectural decorative mouldings.

The Mansion is a replication of a grand English country house and The main building is predominantly bluestone with a simple yet awe inspiring sandstone facade on three sides, the largest example of Barabool Hills sandstone applied to a privately owned building in Victoria. A stone railed balcony surrounds the central block on three sides. A central tower sits high above the second storey. Below an arcade, beautifully panelled and painted, allows soft light through a series of arches to the large windows of the internal structure.

The two wings of the Mansion feature 60 rooms and adjoin at the rear of a central block. The interior is beautifully crafted with ornate cornices, display niches and superb wrought iron detailing on the grand staircase. Elaborately decorated arches and large, feature windows of stained glass featuring motifs and pastoral scenes add further decorative features. Corinthian pilasters or piers are featured in the main hall. A massive formal dining room and a British style drawing room are reminders of bygone times.

Many of the mansion’s associated buildings are still standing and remain unchanged. The original, authentic 19th century laundry is a rare example and is still totally intact whilst the sunken glasshouse and the 17th century style grotto are unique in Victorian Architecture.

Modern architectural decorative mouldings and features are not as ornate and are now available in lightweight materials from the Finishing Touch that are easily installed yet have longevity.

 

The Modern Arch Has Classical Design Elements Yet Is Lightweight and Decorative

crypt-archway-path

Arches have long been used in building design and in modern times they add a classical, elegant finish to a house build.  Originally built in materials such as stone, marble then cement, the easiest and most effective method to build an arch these days is to use a lightweight house moulding with a steel support.

Dating back to 3000BC was the original arch, the corbel arch consisting of two opposing sets of overlapping corbels, resembling inverted staircases, which meet at a peak and create a structure strong enough to support weight from above. Babylonian architecture made wide use of corbel arches. Then the Romans created a semicircular arch that could support great amounts of weight.  A wooden arch shaped frame was first constructed with stone work being built up around the frame and finally a keystone was set in position. This allowed the wooden frame to be removed and the arch was left in position. Stone arch technology was used on large buildings such as the Colosseum in Rome.

The next major design innovation in arches was in Gothic architecture with the experimental use of pointed arches. The pointed shape introduced a new aesthetic dimension and reduced the arch thrusts by as much as fifty percent which meant that the weight of the roof was now being supported by the arches rather than the walls and therefore the walls could be thinner.

The basket arch is a three-centred arch and sometimes called  ‘basket-handle arch’ or ‘anse de panier’. The Basket arch is a flattened arch whose ellipse like shape is determined by three arcs that are interconnected; with each radius being drawn from a different centre. Also known as Semi elliptical or Elliptical, this style of arch is mainly used in modern day building due to its simple design.

The Finishing Touch are the masters of lightweight decorative mouldings and can create the style and shape of arch desired in any building design.  For a custom made decorative arch moulding made from lightweight materials contact the Finishing Touch.

Columns Ancient and Modern

lincoln-memorial

Columns as a decorative architectural feature on buildings were used extensively in ancient times on important buildings. Three major systems in architectural design used by ancient Greeks have stood the test of time and are still seen in architecture to this day. These include the Doric, Ionic and Corinthian styles. Each order has its own definitive characteristics, however they can also be easily confused to the untrained eye.

The most famous Greek system used around the world today is the first order, the Doric style of architecture (pictured above) You will see Doric columns when you visit the Parthenon and Acropolis, distinguished by vertical columns and a plain roof. You will also see this style in historic buildings in southern Italy and Sicily; it is one of the oldest architectural orders that exists today.

The second style is the Ionic order. It is more delicate, intricate, and elegant than Doric architecture. Having originated in eastern Greece, Ionic structures are believed to have become dominant during the Hellenistic period.

ionic-colums

Then there’s the Corinthian style of architecture. Corinthian architecture is intended to be an altered version of the Ionic style with much more detail. Here you’ll see more scrolls , fruit and flower motifs and flourishes.

corinthian-19501_640

These days, in modern Australian architecture we see columns used extensively in housing design.  With the advent of concrete and now lightweight eps building materials it is possible for builders to create columns for suburban homes.  The addition of columns, usually at the entrance of the home, creates a grand, sophisticated façade. The Finishing Touch have a range of lightweight mouldings for columns, both round, tapered and square with capitals in all the styles, along with bases.

 

 

Grand Buildings of Melbourne

The Grand Dame of Australia, the city of Melbourne has an elegant, sophisticated aura , due in part to its classic buildings, which are a fascinating mix of architectural styles. Many of these buildings have significant historical value and it’s fortunate for the city that they withstood the wholesale destruction of so many iconic buildings during the modernisation period in the ‘50s, ‘60s and ‘70s when the State Government set about a major renewal of inner Melbourne

The Athenaeum Theatre was at times under threat as was the beautiful Capitol Theatre across the road in Collins Street. The Athenaeum Theatre is Melbourne’s oldest cultural institution and began life as Melbourne’s first Mechanics Institute, established in 1839, where the Melbourne City Council met until 1852.

Princess Theatre, Melbourne.

Princess Theatre, Melbourne.

The flamboyantly designed Princess Theatre situated in Spring Street was first opened in 1857 and again remodelled in 1886. In recent times it was under threat, but thankfully for Melburnians it was instead revamped, and is still a working theatre. These iconic buildings are wonderful examples of architecture and exhibit the brilliant use ofdecorative mouldings to further decorate and define a building.

When it comes to grandeur the two cathedrals in Melbourne are stunning. St Patrick’s, the Roman Catholic Cathedral was built in stages from 1858 right through until 1940 and is a fine example of Gothic Revival Architecture

St. Patricks Cathedral, Melbourne

St. Patricks Cathedral, Melbourne

whilst St Paul’s Cathedral, the Church of England Cathedral,

St. Pauls Cathedral, Melbourne.

St. Pauls Cathedral, Melbourne.

was constructed between 1880 and 1931 in a Neo-Gothic style. Studying the decorative features of these beautiful buildings is truly inspiring.

The Melbourne Town Hall, situated on the corner of Swanston and Collins Streets, was ready to be used by the City Council for meetings in 1852 and was completed in 1870. This classically designed building is constructed from a mix of bluestone and Tasmanian freestone; it features a clock tower and fine masonry.

As Melbourne grew it developed its character through the construction of grand buildings in the ornate Victorian era style. At 673 Bourke St Melbourne stands what is known as ‘Donkey Wheel House’, a superb example of High Victorian Venetian Gothic Architecture.

Donkey Wheel House, Melbourne.

Donkey Wheel House, Melbourne.

This building was purpose built in 1891 for the Melbourne Tramways and Omnibus Company.

The Old Treasury Building, located in Spring Street, was originally constructed between 1858 and 1862 to hold the gold bullion discovered in the 1850s Gold Rush and was designed by 19 year old Architect J.J.Clarke.

Old Treasury Building, Melbourne

Old Treasury Building, Melbourne

Regarded as one of the finest 19th century buildings in Australia this grand palazzo style building is now open to the public both as a museum and as the Victorian Marriage Registry, a fitting setting to solemnise a marriage.

Columns and Arches Beautiful Architectural Features

crypt-archway-path

Of all the types of architectural decorative mouldings used to create an attractive façade to a building, columns and arches are the most beautiful and eye catching. Dating back to very early architecture they have long been used as an architectural feature.  When they were constructed of stone and stucco they were extremely heavy and difficult to install, thus were only used for large, public buildings or very expensive homes. Concrete made the addition of an arch or columns to a family home more accessible and these days with the development of lightweight decorative mouldings arches and columns have become a common sight throughout suburbia, adding a certain glamour to modern houses.

The Finishing Touch are leading suppliers of high quality decorative mouldings. Their lightweight mouldings are made from computer cut high grade EPS polystyrene and builders can choose from two styles of finish. The sandstone finish moulding is triple coated with a multi-part compound then reinforced with a triple coating of sand whereas the smooth finish moulding is reinforced with fibreglass mesh and coated with one or two coats of an impact resistant and flexible polymer modified cementitious render. Both coatings produce a durable exterior finish, which will not crack, shrink, expand or bend.

The Finishing Touch supply a wide range of decorative mouldings to suit most house styles, including French Provincial, Georgian and post-modern.  Recently the builder of a fifty squares home in Chadstone with North African influences called on the Finishing Touch to supply decorative mouldings for this already built modern home.  The addition of five round columns, each 200mm in diameter and 2.7metres high (model # RO200) with Tuscan capitals and Doric bases will ensure this house has a stunning façade. Another home in Old Warrandyte Road, Donvale required an Arch (model # M1), 120mm x 30mm, 1200 mm wide, along with 18 metres of parapet mouldings (model # P7180), 180mm x 95mm, 5 metres of window architraves (model # M1), 110mm x 30mm and 5.5 metres of flatband moulding (model # M120),  120mm x 30mm.

Decorative Mouldings For Properties in Glen Iris, Ballan and Geelong

An example of decorative mouldings

The Finishing Touch are steadily growing their reputation as suppliers of superior quality decorative mouldings, reliability and style across Victoria. They have just completed manufacture of decorative mouldings for a post-modern, two storey, thirty square home situated at 1751 Malvern Road, Glen Iris with the installation stage of the project about to commence.  They have supplied parapets measuring 180mm x 95mm ( model no. P7180) and window architraves 100mm x 45mm (model no. W1100).  The exterior mouldings will be installed to the front of the building façade, with the window architraves on five windows – three upstairs and two downstairs. The parapet will be installed mid-level between the ground floor and the first floor.  An interesting feature is that the parapets will be used to form a column capital atop the square columns at the entrance.

Two hundred and twenty metres of parapets and two hundred and forty metres of flatbands have recently been manufactured and installed on a single storey building of forty squares in Blakeville Road, Ballan in country Victoria. The parapets, model no. P7200, measure 200mm x 105mm, with the flatbands, model no. M120, measuring 120mm x 30mm.

Some Builders choose supply only of decorative mouldings, which the Builder for a property in Geelong recently did  for parapets and stringers  This single storey post-modern home has an under storey garage and seventy two metres of parapets, model no. M258B and measuring 258mm x 190mm were manufactured and supplied along with seventy two metres of stringers, model no. S1R2, measuring 90mm x 70mm recently by The Finishing Touch.