Current Projects Supplying Lightweight Decorative Mouldings for House Builds

House in Warrandyte with Finishing Touch decorative mouldings

A project was recently completed by the Finishing Touch for an Owner/builder at 12 Kelvin Court, Ringwood North. The post- modern, single storey house of forty squares has 5.4 metres of parapet moulding at the top of the building, across the entrance, model # P8250, sized 250mm x 95mm with 64 metres of a smaller parapet that surrounds the entire perimeter of the house, model # P8200, sized 200mm x 155mm. Five windows have been fitted with window sills, model # WS15, sized 130mm x 5mm and 62 metres of window architraves, model # W1100, sized 100mm x 45mm.

A project presently under development for a house in Balwyn requires 15 metres of parapet moulding, model # P8300, sized 300mm x 235mm and below the larger parapet, 6 metres of a smaller parapet, model # P8250, sized 250mm x 195mm. 4.5 metres in total for three arches, model # W1100, each one measuring 100mm x 45mm adds an eye catching decorative touch to the facade. Nine windows require 45 metres of window architraves, model # W1100, each sized 100mm x 45mm and window sills, model # SR15, each sized 135mm x 185mm. 15 metres of stringer, model# SR4, sized 90mm x 70mm and 50 metres of under gutter moulding, model #PE70, sized 70mm x 70mm completes the job.

Another project under development in North Balwyn is for a French provincial style house with a typical French provincial roof. The build requires 8 metres of parapet moulding, model # P8430, sized 430mm x 335mm, 72 metres of under gutter moulding, model # PE70, sized 70mm x 70mm, and 64 metres of eave moulding, model # PE8200, sized 195mm x 155mm. Thirty five window are to be supplied with window sills, model # WSR15, each sized 135mm x 185mm plus 175 metres of window architraves, model # WDG8XY, each sized 160mm x 50mm. The middle level of the house will be decorated with 45 metres of parapet moulding, model # P8250, sized 250mm x 195mm, whilst the front façade of the home will boast 48 metres of quoining panels, model # Q300, sized 320mm x 30mm – two lines of quoining panels will extend from the roofline to the ground, one a single panel and one a double panel. The front entrance will feature columns and above each column on either side of the entrance single quoining panels will extend to the roofline on the second storey.

Visit our Finishing Touch Products page for drawings and descriptions of the product model numbers quoted here. We also do custom made decorative mouldings, to your specifications. Contact us at the Finishing Touch for a quote.

Rupertswood a Beauty of Bygone Days

Rupertswood Mansion

When the foundation stone was laid for the build of Rupertswood on the 29th of August, 1874 over a thousand people were in attendance. Architect George Brown designed the mansion and it was constructed by George Sumner and Company. Its original interior design was by Shemmel and Shilton. The substantial entrance featuring a superb gatehouse and massive gates were designed by George Brown.

Gatehouse at Rupertswood

The two storey mansion featured a 100ft high tower, mansard roof and ‘widow walk’ and was surrounded by extensive gardens and parklands with a large artificial lake.

The mansion was built for Sir William Clarke in the borough of Sunbury and later passed to his son Rupert upon Sir Clarke’s passing. Rupertswood is of historical significance as it is the birthplace of the Ashes Cricket Series. The historic match was played at Rupertswood during the tour of 1882 and Lady Clarke presented the victorious Captain of the visiting English XI, Ivo Bligh, an urn containing the burnt bails from the match. Entertainment was the order of the day, with hunts, balls and house parties often held by the Clarke family. Their guests arrived by train at the Estate’s own private Railway Station, which was still in use until 2004.

This delightful mansion from yesteryear is a fascinating example of how the addition of exterior and interior architectural decorative mouldings add charm and beauty to the original design.

Rupertswood facade and interior

The decorative mouldings at that time would have been constructed from stone or cement masonry and quite heavy and difficult to place and expensive to repair. At the time such works had to be completed by artisan stone masons at great expense.  In this day and age it is so easy to add the beautiful finish a decorative moulding creates.  The Finishing Touch make a unique lightweight moulding, used on many house designs in Melbourne and surrounds. Their quality exterior decorative mouldings have gained a wide reputation for quality and longevity despite being lightweight and easy to adhere. A product warranty of 7 years is provided, however if a moulding requires replacing it is now relatively simple and easy to accomplish.

Labassa Mansion A Prime Example of Architectural Decorative Features

Labassa Caulfield

The mansion known as Labassa in Caulfield was formerly a modest country house built for Melbourne judge Richard Billing in 1862 and originally named Sylliot Hill. Alexander William Robertson of Cobb and Co Coaches fame, renamed it ‘Ontario’ when he purchased it in the 1880s. Robertson had big plans, commissioning the German born Architect John A B Koch to remodel the house into a 35 room mansion. The home, situated on a 6 hectare site featured gilt embossed wallpapers, ornate and finely detailed stained glass feature windows and a unique ‘trompe l’oeil’ ceiling (a painted three dimensional mural) when remodelled. Robertson also added massive caste iron gates, redolent of an English palace.

The next owner was John Boyd Watson II, the heir to a Bendigo Mining fortune, who purchased the mansion when Robertson died.  Watson was a man of leisure who did not need to work. When he died in 1920 his wife sold the property. Unfortunately, the beautiful home steadily deteriorated over time and by the 1970s it had become a virtual commune with hippy tenants paying homage to Bohemia.

The National Trust purchased the property in 1980 and faithfully restored it to its former glory. Its magnificent verandahs, corinthian arches, ornate plasters, grand staircases, trompe l’oeil ceiling and ornate decorative mouldings on the exterior and interior once again reflecting Architect John Koch’s vision, in its ‘French Second Empire’ style.

Labassa is of genuine architectural significance as the most prominent example of a small number of houses built in Australia in what is known as the French Renaissance style. It is the most important surviving work of German Architect John A B Koch.

Homes of historical architectural significance are prime examples of the beauty of architectural decorative mouldings and much of their magnificence is due to these decorative features. The Finishing Touch are suppliers of modern era decorative mouldings, which are lightweight, high quality and easy to install.

2017 Colour Trends Married To Architectural Styles

post modern design

Looking at the Dulux colour trends for 2017 as forecast by Bree Leech, their Trend Forecaster, Creative Director, Producer and Stylist we can’t help but marry the different colour palettes with house styles. Entwine, based on the idea of weaving and woven colours and Construct based on architectural periods like brutalism with a focus on materials and form and  Sentience the offset to our online lives.

Entwine – an eclectic range of rich, warm colours in earthy red and botanical green with unexpected accents.  The palette is influenced by global cultures and landscapes from around the world, creating a link between modernity and traditions.  The architectural style that comes to mind is Tuscany or Mediterranean which would be a perfect fit to the colourful woven mats from far off lands and mix of rich, warm colours in the interior.  Decorative mouldings for this style from the Finishing Touch include corbels that protrude from the beams and are available in a wonderful array of shapes and styles.

Construct – Luxury is derived not from frivolity but raw materials, structure and form.  This pared back beauty is obtained from rawness in architectural angles, concrete, steel and galvanised finishes. Interiors follow an atmospheric palette of dark blues and greys with accents in platinum, copper and rust.  The architectural style is post-modern, with stark, simple lines. Decorative mouldings accentuate the lines with eave mouldings and flatbands, which can be made to any dimension.

Sentience – using textures in interiors to offset the effect of so much screen time in our lives, the lack of feeling crispy paper when reading  because now we read ibooks, izines and news online. The continual swishing and swiping on our devices means our eyes are tired and our finger tips are feeling the same flat surface, so when we look up and around us we should be surrounded by interesting textures like woollen knitted rugs, linen bedding, painted exposed brick and when we touch we should be feeling handmade ceramics, unrefined soaps and plants. A colour palette in subtle pastels in washed, earthy tones, soft naturals like earthy pinks, new beige and lichen greens. This would go beautifully in a French provincial style home,styled with the great range of Finishing Touch decorative mouldings specially designed for the French provincial style.

Architects Gender Pay Gap Exposed in 2016 Surveys

Sugargum Dve Hillside

The Finishing Touch is a supplier of architectural decorative mouldings to the building industry and found the results of 2016 surveys conducted in both the United Kingdom and Australia showing that male Architects are paid more than female Architects across the board in the UK and for  most levels in Australia disappointing. Not only that but the pay disparity is actually widening in the UK, according to the results of the 2016 Women in Architecture survey conducted by the Architects’ Journal and The Architectural Review.
The UK survey shows salary discrepancies of up to £55,000 at top levels between women and their male counterparts, as well as widespread discrimination in the workplace and on site. Women working in architecture are also waiting longer to start their family than the UK average the survey shows and that female architects found that having children has a detrimental impact on their career.
It doesn’t matter what level of seniority the women have climbed to, 36% still reported experiencing sexual discrimination whether they were directors, partners, principals, associate directors or project architects, and not far behind, 24 %of architectural assistants reported the same. This discrimination took place in the office, on site and in meetings with clients and contractors.
This bias is represented starkly in salary figures at all levels, with the gap broadening between men and women as seniority increases.The survey showed that women are paid £55,000 less than men at director, partner and principal level. This figure has risen by £42,000 in the last two years.
In Australia the Association of Consulting Architects conducted a national salary survey in 2016 and also found gender pay gaps for architects in all but two of the nine levels surveyed.

gender-pay-difference-aca-aust
Due to this survey sample changing from year to year, it was not possible to analyse whether the gender pay gap is increasing or decreasing.  However, the association reported that the ongoing suggestions of gender-based gaps in this data are of serious concern. The ACA advises architects that there is a clear business case for pay equity, as well as the obvious ethical issue.
As a supplier of architectural decorative mouldings to the building industry the Finishing Touch often work in sync with Architects producing decorative mouldings to create the finishing touches to the architectural style of their buildings, both from the product catalogue but also manufacturing customised lightweight mouldings to specifications.

The Modern Arch Has Classical Design Elements Yet Is Lightweight and Decorative

crypt-archway-path

Arches have long been used in building design and in modern times they add a classical, elegant finish to a house build.  Originally built in materials such as stone, marble then cement, the easiest and most effective method to build an arch these days is to use a lightweight house moulding with a steel support.

Dating back to 3000BC was the original arch, the corbel arch consisting of two opposing sets of overlapping corbels, resembling inverted staircases, which meet at a peak and create a structure strong enough to support weight from above. Babylonian architecture made wide use of corbel arches. Then the Romans created a semicircular arch that could support great amounts of weight.  A wooden arch shaped frame was first constructed with stone work being built up around the frame and finally a keystone was set in position. This allowed the wooden frame to be removed and the arch was left in position. Stone arch technology was used on large buildings such as the Colosseum in Rome.

The next major design innovation in arches was in Gothic architecture with the experimental use of pointed arches. The pointed shape introduced a new aesthetic dimension and reduced the arch thrusts by as much as fifty percent which meant that the weight of the roof was now being supported by the arches rather than the walls and therefore the walls could be thinner.

The basket arch is a three-centred arch and sometimes called  ‘basket-handle arch’ or ‘anse de panier’. The Basket arch is a flattened arch whose ellipse like shape is determined by three arcs that are interconnected; with each radius being drawn from a different centre. Also known as Semi elliptical or Elliptical, this style of arch is mainly used in modern day building due to its simple design.

The Finishing Touch are the masters of lightweight decorative mouldings and can create the style and shape of arch desired in any building design.  For a custom made decorative arch moulding made from lightweight materials contact the Finishing Touch.

Columns Ancient and Modern

lincoln-memorial

Columns as a decorative architectural feature on buildings were used extensively in ancient times on important buildings. Three major systems in architectural design used by ancient Greeks have stood the test of time and are still seen in architecture to this day. These include the Doric, Ionic and Corinthian styles. Each order has its own definitive characteristics, however they can also be easily confused to the untrained eye.

The most famous Greek system used around the world today is the first order, the Doric style of architecture (pictured above) You will see Doric columns when you visit the Parthenon and Acropolis, distinguished by vertical columns and a plain roof. You will also see this style in historic buildings in southern Italy and Sicily; it is one of the oldest architectural orders that exists today.

The second style is the Ionic order. It is more delicate, intricate, and elegant than Doric architecture. Having originated in eastern Greece, Ionic structures are believed to have become dominant during the Hellenistic period.

ionic-colums

Then there’s the Corinthian style of architecture. Corinthian architecture is intended to be an altered version of the Ionic style with much more detail. Here you’ll see more scrolls , fruit and flower motifs and flourishes.

corinthian-19501_640

These days, in modern Australian architecture we see columns used extensively in housing design.  With the advent of concrete and now lightweight eps building materials it is possible for builders to create columns for suburban homes.  The addition of columns, usually at the entrance of the home, creates a grand, sophisticated façade. The Finishing Touch have a range of lightweight mouldings for columns, both round, tapered and square with capitals in all the styles, along with bases.