Friday 13th Haunted Houses

Studley Park House Camden NSW

It’s Friday 13th. To get your spook on we are looking at some famous haunted houses. Studley Park House in Camden, was originally built by grazier William Payne in 1889. Although considered haunted, it is a beautiful building, featuring many admirable decorative mouldings. The death of two children has earned the house its haunted reputation. The residence became a boarding college and in 1909 a 14-year-old student, Ray Blackstone, drowned in a dam near the residence. His body is believed to have been kept at the cellar until it was buried. The building was sold soon after and reverted back to a residence. The son of acclaimed business man Arthur Adolphus Gregory died at the house in 1939 from appendicitis and his body was kept in the theatrette.

Spooky disturbances at the house include a hangman’s noose found dangling from a steeple roof by builders renovating in 2010, unexplained lights, sightings of a lady who stands at the window and a photograph of a ghostly young boy in the basement taken by ghost hunters.

Closer to home in Bundoora, on the outskirts of Melbourne, is the old Larundel Mental Asylum, famous in its day for incarcerating a great number of Melburnians suffering mental illness. Closed in 2001, it has been an abandoned building, off limits to the public but has built a reputation for being haunted. This attractive building was one of Melbourne’s three “magnificent asylums for the insane” built in the 1930s and 40s.

Larundal Mental Asylum

Now covered in graffiti the building, since its closure, has been a hangout for ghost hunters, graffiti artists and squatters. There have been reports of loud banging, children’s laughter, crying, and an eerie music box. Serial killer Peter Dupas was treated here, adding to the mystique of the building. Only a few original buildings of the vast complex remain and are soon to be reconstructed into apartments, completing the residential development already constructed on the grounds, which includes a shopping centre.

 

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Decorative Mouldings for Heritage Restoration & French Provincial Home

 

 

 

 

Example of French Provincial decorative mouldings.

Eight arches with architraves originally adorned a heritage, commercial building, the Queensberry Hotel, situated on the corner of Queensberry Street and Swanton Street, Carlton. At one stage they were removed but recently the decision was made to restore them and the Finishing Touch were called upon to supply their quality architectural mouldings. They supplied the restoration with 27 lengths of 3 metre architrave mouldings, in a style similar to French provincial, model # WDG8XY, sized 120mm x 50mm. These decorative mouldings were used to form the one metre diameter arches. They also supplied a DAP adhesive and sealant.

A French provincial, two storey, fifty square home recently built in Strathmore boasts an elegant façade with the addition of exclusive French provincial decorative mouldings from the Finishing Touch. A beautiful finish was achieved with 58 metres of French provincial parapets, model # P4200, sized 200mm x 195mm, 8 metres of French provincial parapets with dentals, model # P6240, sized 240mm x 220mm and 34 metres of French provincial quoinings, model # Q300, sized 320mm x 30mm. Further decoration was added with 6 metres of French provincial plinth, model DGPL400, sized 400mm x 55mm.

The windows of this Strathmore property were decorated with French provincial architraves, model # W1100, sized 100mm x 45mm, 23 metres of French provincial windowsills, model #WSR15, sized 135mm x 185mm. Adding further glamour to the façade was one large arch for the balcony window and four small arches for windows at the front. 8 metres in total of model #W1100, sized 100mm x45mm was supplied for the arches.

Please view the decorative moulding models on the Finishing Touch Product page